12m Mast Update

Following my extreme disappointment at losing my 12m mast through an ‘agricultural incident’, I have been heartened by a number of people rallying round to help.

Initially George M1GEO and his dad Chris G8OCV tried to repair the mast by cutting off the broken section and rebuilding it, but sadly with a bit of a bend on the remaining damaged section, it would not retract fully and would be impossible to transport.

However LEFARS club Chairman Dick G4DDP had a mast surplus to requirements which he ‘donated’ to me,  I ended up with a replacement mast, while George kept my ‘compromised’ one! Christmas came a few weeks early for me this year!

I have some minor work to do in order to use it, as I had modified my old mast for use with a Clark guy rope kit, as the lower eyelet on the mast were damaged. This replacement mast has the same issue, but a while ago, I bought a replacement bottom section with intact eyelets, so as soon as the weather warms up i will replace that section and I should have a 100% usable Racal 12m PU mast again, this time using the original Racal guy ropes.

My sincere gratitude goes out to Dick for helping me recover what was an irreplaceable part of my portable setup. I certainly could not afford to buy a replacement mast due to my current financial circumstances!

Sick Icom IC746 repaired

I have been dreading it.. I have put it off for ages, Yes the 746 has been fixed.

A few months ago, I had been using the radio (my main HF rig) and it started making funny noises when the internal tuner tried to match the aerial. It also would not match.

I looked up on the internet for possible issue and solution and discovered that the radio had a known issue with the tuners motors, where a sonic weld fails between the ferrite core and a spindle and washer. The thing is I had a workaround which was to use an external manual ATU, so knowing just how many screws I would have to remove just to get to the motor, the job got put off for some time.

I finally bit the bullet because of the way I operate. With band conditions quite lacklustre at the moment, I frequently band hop, which necessitates frequent re-matching of the aerials. It was becoming a real drag keying up and manually tuning all the time, so I though “damn it, lets get this done’. First thing was to get the video I found about this repair up on my iPad. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdY6RhNOCWg ) and then it was a matter of removing over 30 screws and de-soldering the aerial sockets from the board before I could get to the motor and fix it.

The dreaded stepper motor, note the crimped ends which needed prying out.

The motor was extremely difficult to get apart without either damaging it or impaling my hand on a screwdriver, but eventually I got into it and glued the bits together, reassembled it all and hey presto a few hours after I started the 746 is back in action and working perfectly.

I think my new years resolution is to get things done and not let things build up. You never seem to have enough enthusiasm to fix something when you know what a ball-ache it is going to be to do it and the jobs then start to pile up and you never get around to doing them.

 

Aerial Masts and Agricultural Machinery – a Bad Mix!

Field days are always a great day out and a challenge. The thing is that even in the middle of an empty field (or near empty), and no matter what risk assessment you may perform, there is accounting for the stupidity of others and serious damage and financial loss could be the result.

This summer I was invited to take part in an event and turned up to a field with my van packed full of gear for a serious portable session for the weekend.

Upon arrival I checked out the field and asked the organiser where I could set up and was told, anywhere you like..we have the field to ourselves.

Having no reason to question the fact that we were indeed alone in the field, I set up my Racal PU12 mast and set up my NATO tactical Antenna on it which was huge, but as I was well pass the access points into the field, I thought I was well away from anywhere people would be driving vehicles in and out. I asked if I should put some fluorescent picket fencing around the base of the inverted V antenna ends, but was told that I am so well out of the way, no one is going to go anywhere near me.

Everything was going swimmingly for the first day, then I decided to drop the antenna and change it for a three element tri-bander. I disconnected the antenna ends in preparation to swap the aerials and dived in the back of the van and started putting together a workmate bench which I was going to use to support the main boom of the tri-bander while I attached the elements. While is was in the back of the van I heard a noise which sounded like tractors.. I came out the back of the van to see my mast almost bend double with a piece of farm machinery spinning and spooling up my antenna.

Some contractors had come into the field to pick up a load of dried grass and bale it as hay. The problem was that no-one told the field day organiser, or the guy who gave him permission to use the field.

Perhaps it did not seem important for the contractors to perform a risk assessment before charging into the field, but whatever, it caused a real lot of damage and some real political issues about who was responsible and how the damage was going to be resolved. Sadly it was impossible to find spare sections for the mast to replace the permanently bent or snapped sections. I was therefore out of pocket to the tune of about £500!

The site is important to the group and it was not practical to take the owner to task over the mixup about who should have been doing what in the field. Pursuing the contractors and causing ill will would have also created an issue, so in the end another club member who happened to have a ‘spare’ mast offered to help restore the losses.

In the end, the message I took away from this was: If you feel that certain procedures would be good to follow on health and safety grounds, then do it, even if people say you don’t need to. I allowed myself to get dissuaded from putting up picket fencing as a warning about aerial ends. Also that no matter how confident you are that the people in a field know what they are doing, there is no accounting for the poor work practices of others, who should not have been in the field at the same time as the field day group.

I have not mentioned any of the parties involved, but apart from me being totally apoplectic at the time and wanting to sue the pants off of anyone involved, taking a step back and being reflective allowed for other things to happen to help repair my losses. Hopefully it means that the field can still be used by the radio group, and the status quo is restored.

It just means that Risk Assessment will be a higher priority on my next /p expedition, and to presume that everyone will act like an idiot around my mast and aerial setup! OK My NATO antenna can’t be replaced as they are as rare as hens teeth, but the upside is that I have plenty of kevlar aerial wire with which to make new home-brew dipoles, delta loops etc!